Knowledge for Development

Worldwide


2nd World Congress of Agroforestry

Website of the 2nd World Congress of Agroforestry on the topic ‘Agroforestry – The Future of Global Land Use’ that took place in August 2009. The Congress assessed opportunities to leverage scientific agroforestry in promoting sustainable land use worldwide. It served as a forum for close to 1200 agroforestry researchers, educators, practitioners and policy makers from around the world to share new research findings, lessons, experiences and ideas that can help influence decisions that impact on livelihoods and the global environment. It helped explore new opportunities and strengthen existing partnerships in agroforestry research, education, training and development, and encouraged the formation of new networks and communities of practice, and reinforced old ones.

8/06/2010


World Agroforestry Centre

The World Agroforestry Centre is part of the alliance of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) centres dedicated to generating and applying the best available knowledge to stimulate agricultural growth, raise farmers’ incomes and protect the environment. The Centre’s vision is for a rural transformation in the developing world as smallholder households strategically increase their use of trees in agricultural landscapes to improve their food security, nutrition, income, health, shelter, energy resources and environmental sustainability. The Centre’s mission is to generate science-based knowledge about the diverse roles that trees play in agricultural landscapes, and use its research to advance policies and practices that benefit the poor and the environment. Here are some of their publications that are of interest: Making sub-Saharan African forests work for people and nature ; Improving livelihoods through agroforestry, Annual report 2008; Trees on farm ; Creating an evergreen agriculture in Africa ; Restoring lives and landscapes: how a partnership between local communities and the state is saving forests and improving livelihoods in Guinea

8/06/2010


XIIIth World Forestry Congress ‘Forests in development: a vital balance’

Site of the XIIIth World Forestry Congress ‘Forests in development: a vital balance’, held from 18 to 23 October at Buenos Aires (Argentina). These regular meetings serve as a forum for governments, universities, civil society and the private sector to exchange their views and experiences and to formulate recommendations to be implemented at the regional, national and global levels. The Congress also provides an opportunity to present an overview of the state of forests and forestry in order to discern trends, adapt policies and raise awareness among decision and policy makers, the public and other stakeholders. The Congress has advisory rather than executive functions; its participants attend in their personal capacities. The implementation of recommendations is a matter solely for those to whom they are addressed: governments, international organizations, scientific bodies and forest owners, amongst others. The results of these actions are presented to the FAO Conference, which can, through a resolution, endorse any declaration from the Congress.

8/06/2010


Center for International Forestry Research

The Center for International Forestry Research is a non-profit, global facility dedicated to advancing human wellbeing, environmental conservation and equity. It conducts research that enables more informed and equitable decision-making about the use and management of forests in less-developed countries, helps policy makers and practitioners shape effective policy, improves the management of tropical forests and addresses the needs and perspectives of people who depend on forests for their livelihoods. Their multidisciplinary approach considers the underlying drivers of deforestation and degradation which often lie outside the forestry sector: forces such as agriculture, infrastructure development, trade and investment policies and even law enforcement.

8/06/2010


IDDRI

Although it is acknowledged that forests – especially tropical ones – contain a significant share of global biodiversity, particular attention is now being drawn to their role in the provision of different ecosystem services, including climate services. Previously, IDDRI focused work on the role of private standards in forest management, in order to better understand how the emerging private standardisation and certification systems participate in the handling of global sustainable development issues in a growing number of sectors (forestry, of course, but also agriculture, fisheries, tourism, mining, etc.). This research, conducted in collaboration with CIRAD, revealed the role played by states in disseminating forms of private governance (under the impetus of international NGOs), along with the limited scope of these mechanisms due to the national reappropriation/reinterpretation of standards within the framework of national public policies.

8/06/2010


Global Forest Coalition

Website of the Global Forest Coalition, whose mission is to reduce poverty amongst, and avoid impoverishment of, indigenous peoples and other forest-dependent peoples, by advocating the rights of these peoples as a basis for forest policy and addressing the direct and underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation. The main strategic approach of the Global Forest Coalition is to build the capacity of NGOs and Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations (IPOs) to monitor and engage in international forest policy and to support national initiatives to implement the results of international forest policy processes. A complementary strategy is to facilitate joint advocacy campaigns by its members, targeting international forest policy processes to ensure that they promote socially just and effective forest policies that respect the rights and needs of indigenous peoples and other forest peoples.

8/06/2010


Global Network of Forest Science Cooperat

Website of the Global Network of Forest Science Cooperation. Policy makers have repeatedly stated a need for more complete scientific information on the ecological, social and economic impacts of climate change on forests and people to support management and policy decisions. They recommended making adaptation of forests to climate change the subject of the first scientific assessment of GFEP. Accordingly, an Expert Panel on Adaptation of Forests to Climate Change was formed by the GFEP Steering Committee in late 2007 to carry out this assessment. Their voluntary collaboration between February 2008 and 2009 has resulted in the most comprehensive assessment to date regarding: the interrelations among forest ecosystems, the services they provide, and climate change; the past and future impacts of climate change on forest ecosystems and the people that depend on these ecosystems; management and policy options for adaptation.

8/06/2010


World Bank website

The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. Its mission is to fight poverty for lasting results and to help people help themselves and their environment by providing resources, sharing knowledge, building capacity and forging partnerships in the public and private sectors. The World Development Report 2008 calls for greater investment in agriculture in developing countries. The report warns that the sector must be placed at the centre of the development agenda if the goals of halving extreme poverty and hunger by 2015 are to be realized. WDR 2008.

8/06/2010


International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD)

The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD) is a unique international effort that will evaluate the relevance, quality and effectiveness of agricultural knowledge, science, and technology (AKST), and effectiveness of public and private sector policies as well as institutional arrangements in relation to AKST. These reports were agreed to at an Intergovernmental Plenary Session in Johannesburg, South Africa, in April 2008.

8/06/2010


Small Grants Programme

For almost two decades, the Small Grants Programme has been working with communities around the world to combat the most critical environmental problems and has successfully demonstrated that supporting communities in their efforts to achieve more sustainable livelihoods is very important in bringing change and achieving global environmental benefits. With a presence in 122 countries and more than 11,000 grants awarded worldwide, SGP supports projects of non-governmental and community-based organizations in developing countries thus demonstrating that community action can maintain the fine balance between human needs and environmental imperatives. The main focal areas of the programme are climate-change abatement and adaptation, conservation of biodiversity, protection of international waters, reduction of the impact of persistent organic pollutants and prevention of land degradation. The list of projects concerning agroforestry can be found the website.

8/06/2010