Knowledge for Development

Nanotechnology

Science technology and innovation at the nano-scale (STI-NANO) is being positioned as the new frontier for driving industrial expansion and providing answers to societies’ problems. This folder presents an overview of the development trends and potential of STI-NANO and examines the implications for ACP countries – more specifically with regard to agriculture and medicine Links to related websites and publications complement the lead articles and provide interesting background information in this challenging field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Prepared by KIT in collaboration with CTA – April 2008, Edited by J.A. Francis, CTA & J. Sluijs, KIT.

Guillaume Gruère, Clare Narrod, and Linda Abbott, IFPRI Policy Brief 19, June 2011 This policy brief by IFPRI presents a review of the potential opportunities and challenges of using nanotech applications for agriculture, food, and water in developing countries.Little research has targeted developing-country needs and, in particular, the needs of the poor, which has created critical gaps in the scientific understanding of ways to improve the situation of the poor (both as producers and as consumers). Public scientists working in this area have kept a relatively narrow focus on certain applications and may not be aware of the needs of the poor and how to ensure uptake in a developing-country situation. 30/08/2011
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ICPCNanoNet is a support action funded by the EU under FP7 for four years from 1st June 2008. It brings together partners from the EU, China, India, Russia and Africa and aims to provide wider access to published nanoscience research, and opportunities for collaboration between scientists in the EU and International Cooperation Partner Countries (ICPC). This is being achieved through an open access electronic archive of nanoscience publications (Nano Archive) and tools to facilitate networking between scientists in different world regions. ICPCNanoNet is coordinated by the Institute of Nanotechnology (UK) and includes Sociedade Portuguesa de Inovação (Portugal), St Petersburg Electrotechnical University (Russia), Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (India), Chinese Society of Micro-Nano Technology (China), MERIT, Universiteit Maastricht (Netherlands), Malsch TechnoValuation (Netherlands) and NanoAfNet (Africa). (Source: Cordis, 7 September 2010) 05/11/2010
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EDES is an ACP-EU programme funded by the 9th European Development Fund. It involves nine partners from France, the United Kingdom, Belgium and Denmark, and is working within a global framework of support of poverty alleviation through economic development. CIRAD is coordinating the programme's training component."Starting in 2011, we will be training 6000 people in the concept of food safety, in more than 35 countries " says Didier Montet, coordinator of the team of twelve CIRAD researchers working on the project. "We will be beginning in April with a course for ACP training staff. Some 20% of the work will be done in the private sector ".The aim is to improve the food safety of ACP foodstuffs exported to Europe. Such goods must comply with regulation 882/2004, which means bringing all these food products into line with European regulatory systems. The aim is to alleviate poverty in ACP countries by maintaining their access to the European, and also the local and regional, market.Specific modules have been developed for the following training sessions : food safety governance official controls good practice in international trade launch and monitoring of official control laboratories risk analysis and management communication on risks. Visit: http://www.coleacp.org/edes/index-en.htmlRead CIRAD's report: http://goo.gl/9iRPR 03/05/2011
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In 2006, researchers from Demos, Practical Action and the University of Lancaster collaborated on a process designed to engage Zimbabwean community groups and scientists from both the North and South in debates about new (nano) technologies. Recommendations were formulated with regard to the critical issues of affordability, resource mobility, awareness, acceptability, sustainability, and the policy framework. Read this document. 29/04/2008
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For the first time, scientists have succeeded in growing empty particles derived from a plant virus and have made them carry useful chemicals. The external surface of these nano containers could be decorated with molecules that guide them to where they are needed in the body, before the chemical load is discharged to exert its effect on diseased cells. The containers are particles of the Cowpea mosaic virus, which is ideally suited for designing biomaterial at the nanoscale. (Source: John Innes Centre, 10 March 2010) 22/03/2010
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Science has advanced to the point that cutting edge research involves working with individual atoms and molecules. Nanotechnology holds the promise to exceed the advances achieved in recent decades in information and computer technology and biotechnology. Its applications are expected to have dramatic impacts, such as building tremendously faster computers, constructing lighter aircrafts, finding cancerous tumors still invisible to the human eye, or generating vast amounts of energy from highly efficient solar cells, and possibly improving agriculture (Anane-Fenin, 2006). 29/04/2008
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Science technology and innovation at the nano-scale (STI-NANO) are expected to revolutionalize societies in unprecedented ways by manipulating the unusual, diverse and complex behaviour of matter. While developed countries are investing steadily in this new frontier science with the urgency and effort that are consistent with the anticipated economic potential of STI-NANO, the ACP countries are essentially not in the game. This contribution reviews these issues and urges ACP countries to begin making strategic investments in STI-NANO. 29/04/2008
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